domingo, 6 de enero de 2019

Inside 66 Records, the music label that saw its launch end in a brutal Collingwood street brawl


A number of artists who performed at the 66 Records launch on Saturday night have previously recorded “drill” rap songs.
The drill rap genre has been linked to a number of stabbings and gang violence across London.
In August, rapper Siddique Kamara was stabbed to death in London, less than six months after he had been cleared of murder himself.
After his trial, Mr Kamara linked the music genre and violence.
“The crime that’s happening right music does influence it. You’ve got to put your hands up and say drill music does influence it,” he said.
But added, “Knife crime and gun crime has been going on way before drill music … 10 years, 20 years, people were still getting cheffed up (attacked with knives)”.
In an invitation to the event, 66 Records warned people coming to the launch to be on their best behaviour.
“There will be hired security so trouble makers be aware, we all looking to have a good time,” the event invite read.
A day before the launch, the event’s organiser known as J-Nelly also warned revellers on Facebook that, “violence will not be tolerated”.
“A moment of anger isn’t worth a lifetime of bad labeling (sic),” he wrote in all capitals.
J-Nelly said organisers had also met with ‘‘federal detectives, who are very concerned with the energy, which they have related to the latest sparks of new reports degrading the African community”.
Police have pledged to speak to every one of the 200 people that attended the 66 Records launch in an attempt to figure out how things turned so violent.
In a statement sent to news.com.au, J-Nelly said fighting was “instigated” by attendees not associated with the label.
“Unfortunately, unidentified members of the public instigaetd fighting within the venue and continued this violence on the stret after the event, when a large group of our fans and friends were travelling home,” he said.
“The victims on this violence include friends and family of ours, and we are focused on praying for their recovery at this time.
“We ask the press and public to refrain from attributing these violent actions to our entire community, when they aer truly the actions of a small group of people who are as yet unknown to us.”
J-Nelly went on to say had worked to prevent violence on the night.
“In no way does violence in the venue or on the streets afterwards benefit us and in fact only causes harm to our reputation and in this case our fans,” he said.
“We have no desire for these things to happen and spent a lot of time and energy before and during the night to prevent it.”


A number of artists who performed at the 66 Records launch on Saturday night have previously recorded “drill” rap songs.
The drill rap genre has been linked to a number of stabbings and gang violence across London.
In August, rapper Siddique Kamara was stabbed to death in London, less than six months after he had been cleared of murder himself.
After his trial, Mr Kamara linked the music genre and violence.
“The crime that’s happening right music does influence it. You’ve got to put your hands up and say drill music does influence it,” he said.
But added, “Knife crime and gun crime has been going on way before drill music … 10 years, 20 years, people were still getting cheffed up (attacked with knives)”.
In an invitation to the event, 66 Records warned people coming to the launch to be on their best behaviour.
“There will be hired security so trouble makers be aware, we all looking to have a good time,” the event invite read.
A day before the launch, the event’s organiser known as J-Nelly also warned revellers on Facebook that, “violence will not be tolerated”.
“A moment of anger isn’t worth a lifetime of bad labeling (sic),” he wrote in all capitals.
J-Nelly said organisers had also met with ‘‘federal detectives, who are very concerned with the energy, which they have related to the latest sparks of new reports degrading the African community”.
Police have pledged to speak to every one of the 200 people that attended the 66 Records launch in an attempt to figure out how things turned so violent.
In a statement sent to news.com.au, J-Nelly said fighting was “instigated” by attendees not associated with the label.
“Unfortunately, unidentified members of the public instigaetd fighting within the venue and continued this violence on the stret after the event, when a large group of our fans and friends were travelling home,” he said.
“The victims on this violence include friends and family of ours, and we are focused on praying for their recovery at this time.
“We ask the press and public to refrain from attributing these violent actions to our entire community, when they aer truly the actions of a small group of people who are as yet unknown to us.”
J-Nelly went on to say had worked to prevent violence on the night.
“In no way does violence in the venue or on the streets afterwards benefit us and in fact only causes harm to our reputation and in this case our fans,” he said.
“We have no desire for these things to happen and spent a lot of time and energy before and during the night to prevent it.”

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